ALASKA CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION

February 4, 1956

SEVENTY-FOURTH DAY

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. We have with us today the Reverend Ralph Disch, minister of the Church of Christ. Reverend Disch will give us our daily invocation.

REVEREND DISCH: Our God and our Father of all mankind, at this, the close of the session that has been meeting for the framing of this great Constitution for the State of Alaska, we ask Thy good guidance as this group continually meets together. Our Father, we pray Thy richest blessings upon us at all times. May we ever have the freedom we now have enjoyed in worshipping Thee and not being afraid of any man. Grant us, our Father, that the privilege we have enjoyed may continue throughout the rest of our lives. Our Father we pray that we may at all times never be afraid to work together for the good of Alaska as we walk down the pathway of time. We ask Thee to guide, guard, and direct our steps and the future destiny of our endeavors here. In the name of Christ, we pray. Amen.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chief Clerk will call the roll.

(The Chief Clerk then called the roll.)

CHIEF CLERK: One absent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: A quorum is present. The Convention will proceed with its regular order of business. Mr. White.

WHITE: Mr. President, just prior to recess at 1:00 o'clock this morning, Mr. Barr addressed a question to me, and during the recess, Mr. President, I have been doing a little checking up and, Mr. Barr, on that charter flight from Anchorage, some airline, the name of which escapes me for the moment, arranged for the flight, but I think the information you wanted was this: the first flight came in on Cordova Airlines and the second flight on Reeve Aleutian Airways. (Laughter) Mr. President, I note the occupants of those two flights with us today in the gallery. They came here under the auspices of Operation Statehood and I would like to move and ask unanimous consent that Mr. Ancil Payne, President of Operation Statehood, be given the privilege of the floor to address us briefly.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, Mr. Payne, you may come forward and have the privilege of the floor.

ANCIL PAYNE: Mr. President and delegates, it is a great honor to appear here in behalf of Operation Statehood. Many members of Operation Statehood who could not be here have watched closely every action that you have taken and regret that they cannot be in attendance with us. As this Convention draws to a close, it is perhaps singularly unlike any other Convention wherein the last few days, everyone comments about "the words that have been spoken here will soon be forgotten but we will carry the spirit forward". In this particular instance as you gentlemen are only too well aware, every word that has been spoken here will go into history for study in the future. Perhaps it has seemed difficult for you from time to time, to draw decisions that were free from political impact. Many of us have not been unaware of the fact that innumerable decisions that perhaps would prejudice people interested in their political futures, forever have been made at this point, fairly, unbiased, and unselfishly. I say many of us have been aware of this because thousands of people have watched the actions of this Convention, on a day in and day out procedure, those people who could not perhaps attend on a regular basis, but have watched closely every action that has been taken. And for the fact that we have here delegates who have been unselfish and honest, we can only thank God. As we landed today, and there were 56 of us coming in, we were greeted by the Fairbanks High School choir, which gave a rendition of the Alaska Flag. And I think it was extremely touching that these high school students were singing the Flag in the city where the constitution was being written. These are, after all, the students who will live under the laws which you have, in these past days, put into writing. They are the ones who will study the actions and the words of each of you through many years in the future as to what you have intended to do and what you have meant in the statements that you have made. Mr. President, some way, it is a touching thing to see those students as they actually stood there singing The Alaska Flag. Perhaps it is somewhat fitting to recognize that in the opening days of your session we presented you with a flag, and now in the closing days we have come back to see the completed document which you have written. We intend to stay over tomorrow for the final signing of it. We recognize that in between those two acts a tremendous amount has been accomplished, and now you are coming within 24 hours to the completion of your work. But it is recognition of all the things that have gone in between that we want to make today, because, after all, following the signing, then we move on to something else which means that this too is an in-between step. We recognize that it is perhaps another one of those steps that all through history men have fought for, way back in biblical times with the prophets down to modern times with the Jeffersons, and the Hamiltons and the Burkes. You fall into the same category of people who have untiringly given your time and your efforts so that you, too, might make a better government under which we might live. For this, then, is a stepping stone to our next step. This document must be ratified. It must be passed by the people. It is a complex thing. We, as members of Operation Statehood, assure each delegate and you, Mr. President, that we will give untiringly now of our time to be sure that this is ratified and understood and that your actions might not just go to no good. For this is our objective as probably one of the very few pressure groups that have only one single pressure to offer, and that is the pressure for ever better government and for the ultimate end that we seek which is statehood. So we cannot thank you enough; we cannot thank you enough for your work and your time, and we only reassure you that we have been in spirit with you and we will continue with you up until the time your work is fully culminated, and we say only this thing and I speak for all our group: "Thank God we have men and women like you doing this splendid work."

PRESIDENT EGAN: Thank you, Mr. Payne, we are very pleased and proud to have you 56 Alaskans from the railbelt area here with us this afternoon. Mr. Johnson.

JOHNSON: Mr. President, I move the speech we have just heard be spread upon today's Journal as part of today's proceedings, and I ask unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Johnson moves and asks unanimous consent that the speech we have just heard be spread upon the pages of today's Journal. Is there objection? Hearing no objection it is so ordered. Are there any communications or petitions before us at this time? If so, the Chief Clerk may proceed with the reading of the communications.

CHIEF CLERK: A telegram from President Eisenhower as follows: "Thank you for your radiogram concerning the work of the Alaska Constitutional Convention. In the event that the proposed Alaska Constitution is ratified by the voters in April, I am certain that Congress will take due cognizance of it in connection with its consideration of any statehood legislation for the Territory. In the meantime, I can assure you that the ratified constitution will receive careful consideration by the Executive Branch. /s/ Dwight D. Eisenhower"

(Further communications read by the Chief Clerk were:

letter of appreciation from the Fairbanks Women's Club; telegram of Governor George M. Leader of Pennsylvania expressing appreciation and regret at not being able to attend closing ceremonies; letter from the Governor of Massachusetts expressing appreciation and regret; letter from Governor Aronson of Montana expressing regret at not being able to attend closing ceremony.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Are there other communications? Mr. Johnson.

JOHNSON: Mr. President, I move and ask unanimous consent that the telegram from President Eisenhower be spread upon today's Journal.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Johnson moves and asks unanimous consent that the telegram from President Eisenhower be spread upon the pages of today's journal. Is there objection?

McNEALY: I object.

ROSSWOG: I second the motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Johnson so moves, seconded by Mr. Rosswog, that the communication received from President Eisenhower be spread upon today's journal. The question is, "Shall the communication be spread upon today's journal?" All those in favor of spreading the communication upon today's journal will signify by saying "aye"; all opposed by saying "no". The "ayes" have it and the communication is ordered spread upon today's journal. Does the special Committee to read the journal have a report to make at this time? Mr. Doogan.

DOOGAN: I have the Journals for the 67th and 68th Convention days. In the journal for the 67th day, on page 20, paragraph 3, second line, starts out "Mr. Kilcher rose to a point of order". That should be "Mr. Hellenthal". For the 68th Convention day, page 4, paragraph 3, bottom line after "Mr. Sundborg", strike the word "and"; after "Mr. Smith" insert a comma and add "and Mr. Hurley period". Those are all of the corrections. Mr. President, and with that I move that the journals for the 67th and 68th days be approved as corrected.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr Doogan moves and asks unanimous consent that the Journals of the 67th and 68th days be approved as corrected by the special Committee to read the journal. Is there objection? Hearing no objection it is so ordered and the journals have been approved. Are there reports of standing committees? Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, your Committee on Administration has met and considered many of the things of the closing ceremony. and in accord with the wishes of the delegates. we are only reserving seats in the small gymnasium at the University for the delegates and their families, and this will include a guest of a person who should not have any of his immediate family here. These seats will be immediately behind the delegates' seats in the hall, and we would like to know how many seats we will have to reserve, so at this time I would ask unanimous consent that the delegates be instructed to come forward to the Chief Clerk's desk in alphabetical order and present the number of guests or members of family that they will have, and Mr. Knight will officiate by presenting them with a gift from a friend of the Convention.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill, are you asking that the Convention be at recess during that time?

COGHILL: At ease.

WHITE: I may not have been listening carefully. Was that just immediate families only, Mr. Coghill?

COGHILL: Yes.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, the Convention is at ease.

(The Convention was at ease while the requested

reservations were placed with the Committee on Administration and while the delegates were presented with souvenir pens donated by Mr. Charles R. Griffin.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, continuing with the committee report, your Committee on administration would like to inform the delegates that, although the gymnasium at the University is quite small, we are going to try to have 765 seats in the Convention, or in the gymnasium for the closing ceremony. Now how many of those will be taken up by the reserved section for the families or guests of the delegates and the delegates themselves will probably come to about 125. Your Committee on administration would also like to inform the delegates that we wish to have the delegates and their families or guests on the campus at the University at 1:30 tomorrow afternoon so that we have time to place you in alphabetical order in the seats, and also to be able to outline the program before the crowd starts assembling in the hall. It is the recommendation of the Administration Committee, also, that immediately following the official signing in the gymnasium that the 55 delegates will retire to this plenary room here, and we will immediately take up the task of signing the other 61 copies that we have to sign. This will be done by joining these tables that we have here together, and to have the delegates start out with "A", Mr. Armstrong, I believe, being the first one on the roll call, to start down the table where the documents will be laid, and signing the individual documents, which will take probably about an hour and a half. One other thing that the Committee on Administration would like to do, Mr. President, under committee reports, we would like to have a recess at this time for possibly a half hour, to meet with the Rules Committee and the President of the Convention. If that is in order, I would so move at this time, that the Administration Committee and the Rules Committee, along with the President of the Convention, meet in the large committee room, 108, upstairs.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill asks unanimous consent. Is there objection? Mr. Stewart.

STEWART: An inquiry, Mr. President. Will there be a bus at 1:00 tomorrow?

COGHILL: We can arrange that, Mr. President.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, the Convention will be at recess until 3:25 p.m.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Are there other reports of standing committees? Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: The Style and Drafting Committee would like to request that any delegates who have in mind the introduction of individual resolutions or any committees which may be planning to introduce resolutions do so, if possible, at this session today so that the Style and Drafting Committee may have an opportunity to have a look at them at meetings which we will hold this afternoon and tomorrow morning if necessary. The time it seems to us will be growing very short for any resolutions to be introduced after today if they are to go through the regular course and be scrutinized by our Committee.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Sundborg, didn't Mr. Coghill state that the Administration Committee has several resolutions? Are they going to be routed through the Style and Drafting Committee? It seemed to be in his statement that they felt that if everyone would first give their resolutions to the Administration Committee that they would all be in one place.

SUNDBORG: I'm not aware of that, Mr. President.

PRESIDENT EGAN: As the Administration Committee is not here -- if there is no objection the Convention will be at ease for a few minutes.

(The Convention was at ease for the time specified.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Are there other reports of standing committees? Mr. Coghill, do you have a further report to make at this time?

COGHILL: The only thing we have to report at this time is that the Style and Drafting Committee has requested that our resolutions be filtered through them first so that there will be only one presentation on the floor, so that all resolutions that we have will be forthcoming at a little later date of the day.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Are there other committee reports? If not, are there reports of select committees? Are there any motions or resolutions? Mr. Marston.

MARSTON: Mr. President, we have a resolution on "Friendly Relations with Canada" that has been pushed around for a long time, and I think it should come up now. It has passed the Style Committee and all of it. I think the Secretary has it. Could it be read now?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Riley, as Chairman of the Rules Committee --

RILEY: Mr. President, the matter hasn't been referred to the Rules Committee. I believe it went from the floor to the Style and Drafting Committee last week.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: Mr. President, it's still in the Style and Drafting Committee and it was being styled as recently as a minute ago. I know it is not ready to be reported to the Convention floor yet. We expect to have it out -- we could have it out later today if there would be a recess, or we could have it at tomorrow's session.

MARSTON: Mr. President, one more little piece of business I would like to get on its way and I have tried to put it through the Committee, but they tell me it is too late to go through the Committee of resolutions and asked me to present it direct to this body from me, as a representative of this body. It's a resolution which we took two hours on one night here and tried to put it into the Constitution and failed. I would like to have this read now and placed out. It came back to me from the Committee.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Are you asking that copies be passed out to each delegate?

MARSTON: Yes.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Would the Sergeant at Arms please distribute copies of the resolution?

COGHILL: While the Sergeant at Arms is passing that out, is there any special resolution of thanks that any of the delegates would wish the Committee on Administration to consider or write up, at our next recess if they would contact me, I have a list of the resolutions that we have prepared, and to assure that there is a complete list so submitted.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Marston, are you asking that the resolution be accepted by the Convention at this time?

MARSTON: Would the secretary read it? I would like to have just two minutes on it.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Would the Chief Clerk please read the resolution that would be offered by Mr. Marston?

(The Chief Clerk read the resolution introduced by Mr.

Marston, entitled "Native Land Grants".)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Marston.

MARSTON: Mr. President, I tried to put this in the body of the Constitution and I failed, but I think we could do no less than we are doing here. Future historians --

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Marston, do you ask unanimous consent that it be received by the Convention?

MARSTON: Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that it be received by the Convention.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, the resolution will be considered before the Convention in first reading at this time. The Chief Clerk will read the "Resolve" clause.

(The Chief Clerk then read the "Resolve" clause.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Marston, it would be in order now, if you so desire, to ask unanimous consent that the rules be suspended in order that the resolution be considered in second reading before us.

MARSTON: Mr. President, I ask that the rules be suspended and that this resolution be considered in second reading.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Marston moves and asks unanimous consent that the rules be suspended and that this resolution be considered in second reading. Now it is open for amendment if there are any proposed amendments to the resolution. Are there amendments to be proposed for the resolution? Mr. McCutcheon.

McCUTCHEON: If there are no amendments to the resolution, I will ask unanimous consent that the rules be suspended and that the resolution be advanced to third reading for final consideration.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. McCutcheon moves and asks unanimous consent that the rules be suspended, that the resolution be placed before us in third reading for final consideration, and be read by title only by "Resolve" only, and placed in final passage. Is there objection? Hearing no objection, it is so ordered and the resolution is now before us in third reading and is open for debate. Mr. Marston.

MARSTON: Future historians and students who study this Constitution will never understand why we don't mention the great people who lived here before we came. Most lands are acquired by the clash of arms and a treaty was made. With outstretched hands they welcomed us here. We wouldn't be here now if it wasn't for those people who came ahead of us, and I think we must recognize those people some way in this Constitution. Otherwise, this Constitution will lack some of its soul and heart that it should have and I think we have this obligation and we might do it even this way through a resolution. Let us not draw about us a cloak of righteousness and stick our heads in the sand and do nothing about it. The fishermen who were in distress -- we did something about that, and I think this Constitution will live because we are doing some of the things that need to be done about people today, and not so much about the founding fathers, which were great fathers. But we bring it up to a living document. We recognized the fishermen in distress and did what we could about it. I hope we will do something about this resolution that we have in here now. I told you about George Lockwood who had good title but our new civilization that has rolled in here and destroyed his title, his squatter's rights. He had been pushed off the beach where he fished and his children played on the beach. His blueberry patch in the back of his fishing camp has been destroyed by big "cats" going through it, and I would like to restore George Lockwood on to his property, which he is entitled to, by giving him a new title under the new civilization. I want you to remember George Lockwood and that story we told you an hour and a half here one night. And that is all I have on this resolution just a salute to these people and a suggestion. And I think the Constitution will be shortcoming if we don't mention this.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Doogan.

DOOGAN: Mr. President, as Mr. Marston has pointed out, this resolution was belabored for a matter of a couple hours, not only once but twice, trying to have it adopted into the Constitution. We had other points that may or may not come up by resolution, that we have been trying to adopt into the Constitution, and some of us got some knots on our heads and didn't make it. My personal feeling is that any resolution of substance that we have tried to adopt into the Constitution and have failed in so doing, should not now come out as a resolution for the first Alaska State Legislature. I feel that we have a good Constitution, and I feel that any resolutions of this nature that we bring out now doesn't add to the work that we have done.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is there further discussion? Mr. Kilcher

KILCHER: I would like to speak in favor of the resolution. If I remember correctly, a lot of us delegates who ultimately decided when the matter was on the floor before that it should not be included in the Constitution, we understood that it was rather a matter of a resolution and a lot of us I think silently agreed to that, some of us openly. I think it is really a good mannered resolution and a good gesture towards our Native friends and I am very much in favor of it.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no further discussion, the question is, "Shall the resolution introduced by Mr. Marston be adopted by the Convention?" The Chief Clerk will call the roll.

(The Chief Clerk called the roll with the following result:

Yeas: 44 - Armstrong, Awes Barr, Boswell, Buckalew, Coghill, Collins, Cross, Davis, Emberg, H. Fischer, Gray, Harris, Hellenthal, Hermann, Hilscher, Hinckel, Hurley, Johnson, Kilcher, King, Knight, Lee, Londborg, McCutcheon, McLaughlin, McNealy, McNees, Marston, Metcalf, Nolan, Nordale, Peratrovich, Riley, R. Rivers, V. Rivers, Rosswog, Smith, Stewart, Taylor, VanderLeest, White, Wien, Mr. President.

Nays: 9 - Cooper, Doogan, V. Fischer, Laws, Nerland, Poulsen, Reader, Sweeney, Walsh.

Absent: 2 - Robertson and Sundborg.)

CHIEF CLERK: 44 yeas, 9 nays, and 2 absent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: So the "yeas" have it and the resolution is ordered adopted. Mr. Hellenthal.

HELLENTHAL: Mr. President, with Mr. Marston's acquiesence (acquiescence) I ask that this matter be referred to Style and Drafting solely for the purpose of correcting minor errors in form. I note one in the resolving clause, and if that is agreeable with Mr. Marston, I would like to make that request a matter of unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Hellenthal asks unanimous consent that the resolution be referred to the Style and Drafting Committee for the purpose stated. Is there objection? Hearing no objection it is so ordered. We now have before us the Constitution, the proposed Constitution for the State of Alaska. We have the report of the Style and Drafting Committee with relation to the proposed Constitution. Mr. Davis.

DAVIS: Mr. President, Mr. Sundborg, the Chairman of the Style and Drafting Committee, is presently at the News-Miner working on the final format of the Constitution. In his absence, on behalf of Style and Drafting, I would like to report orally that the changes and corrections and amendments made last night have all been made and are presently being incorporated into the printed draft. At this time Style and Drafting has completed its work on the Constitution and we request approval of the document approval of the form that we have made in styling the document. I ask unanimous consent at this time.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Davis asks unanimous consent that the report of the Style and Drafting Committee be approved by the Convention. Is there objection? Hearing no objection, it is so ordered.

DAVIS: Now, Mr. President, are there other items of business to come before the Convention at this time?

PRESIDENT EGAN: The only thing, Mr. Davis, that the Chair knows of at this time is that there was a general agreement that, if there were to be any statements, they would be made at this time, relative to the Constitution, and then a motion for the previous question would be made and that we would call the roll at the ceremony tomorrow afternoon.

DAVIS: I am prepared now, Mr. President, to make the motion for the previous question, but I will hold it if there are any comments to be made.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is there anyone who wishes to be heard at this time relative to the Constitution? Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, would it be in order to revert to the business of the committee in order to pass out these pass cards for the delegates' families for the Convention tomorrow?

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, we might hold up the move for the previous question.

HELLENTHAL: Point of order.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Your point of order, Mr. Hellenthal.

HELLENTHAL: As far as I know, there is no question before the house at the present time.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Well there is none, but if there is no objection, Mr. Hellenthal, but before the question is put, we might take a recess in order to let the Administration Committee distribute their cards.

HELLENTHAL: Might I suggest that the question be put by the oldest member of the group.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The request asking that the previous question be ordered you mean, Mr. Hellenthal?

HELLENTHAL: No. I mean the question itself.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Oh. You mean tomorrow?

HELLENTHAL: No, I imagine it will have to be put today.

RILEY: May we have a one-minute recess?

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, the Convention will be at recess.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Mr. Armstrong.

ARMSTRONG: Mr. Egan -- Mr. President, from the very beginning of this Convention it had been my hope that there might be from this Convention a statement or pledge to Alaska's children. I believe that it is time at the close of this Convention to say to the children of Alaska, in light of this completed Constitution, that we do solemnly make a promise to them and with them in our future State, and so, sir, I would move that a committee be appointed to draw up a resolution that would be known as a pledge to Alaska's children, this pledge to be signed by you, sir, as the President of this Convention; a pledge that would be able to be placed in every school room; a pledge that would say to them that we call upon them for their cooperation as we move toward statehood, because they will be the future citizens. I would hope that this would say that we are providing for them a place where they may practice the faith of their choice; an opportunity for education to meet today's problems; a country filled with trees and streams, bounded by adequate laws to help them in the future; and the possibility of a future state that can be theirs where they can operate as the citizens of tomorrow. So I move, sir, for this committee.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Armstrong moves -- do you ask unanimous consent, Mr. Armstrong.

ARMSTRONG: I ask for unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: That a special committee be appointed for that purpose. If there is no objection, the Chair will appoint Mr. Armstrong, Mr. Coghill, Mr. Walsh, and Mr. Victor Rivers as such committee. Mr. Ralph Rivers.

R. RIVERS: I would suggest that we call it a bequest instead of a pledge. We are bestowing something upon them; we are not pledging something to them. They, in turn, are going to be pledging to us to carry out the framework which we have afforded them. Just a suggestion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Taylor.

TAYLOR: I would move for suspension of the rules and proceed to the consideration of the resolutions which the Administration Committee has in its possession, and that suspension of the rules would be that we by-pass the Style and Drafting Committee with the reservation that they might look them over for any defects in phraseology, or grammar or punctuation. I think that would expedite the business of the Convention if we could dispose of that today.

PRESIDENT EGAN: You mean, Mr. Taylor, you are asking suspension of the rules and asking that the resolutions be placed before us at this time; then if they are adopted, referred to the Style and Drafting Committee for any phraseology changes?

TAYLOR: Any grammatical changes.

PRESIDENT EGAN: You have heard Mr. Taylor's unanimous consent request. Is there objection? Mr. Fischer.

V. FISCHER: Mr. President, I would like to know just how many resolutions will be before us; exactly what they contain. if they are to come up for adoption immediately. I think it would be more proper if we could see them, work them over, and then adopt them tomorrow afternoon or Monday morning. Therefore, I object.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Objection is heard. Do you so move, Mr. Taylor?

TAYLOR: I so move.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Taylor so moves. Is there a second?

EMBERG: I second the motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Seconded by Mr. Emberg, that the rules be suspended and that we consider the resolutions that are now in the Administration Committee at this time. Mr. White.

WHITE: Mr. President, may I address a question to Mr. Coghill? Can you let us know when it is your intention, should this motion not pass, to bring out such resolutions as may be in the possession of your Committee?

COGHILL: It was the feeling of the Committee on Administration that we should bring out these resolutions today, and it was brought to the Committee's attention that it was desirable that they should first be looked over by the Style and Drafting Committee as to form. Now I have six resolutions here and we have at least four more, and I was hoping that the immediate statehood resolution would be on the floor, but it has not yet come out of the boiler room. and that is the one I would like to present first as our first resolution, requesting statehood at the earliest possible time. We have two mimeographed and four not mimeographed that we can work on right now if it is the body's wish.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Ralph Rivers.

R. RIVERS: Mr. President, we have set a precedent already. We took prompt action on Major Marston's resolution and then by unanimous consent we just let Style and Drafting have a last look at it, I presume with more or less full power to act, and that would be the case here. And I think if we have a half hour to spend we ought to get to work on this stuff.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The question is, "Shall the rules be suspended and the resolutions that are ready in the Administration Committee be placed before the Convention at this time." The Chief Clerk will call the roll.

(The Chief Clerk called the roll with the following result:

Yeas: 47 - Armstrong, Awes, Barr, Boswell, Coghill, Collins, Cooper, Cross, Davis, Emberg, H. Fischer, Gray, Harris, Hellenthal, Hermann, Hilscher, Hinckel, Hurley, Johnson, Kilcher, King, Knight, Laws, Lee, Londborg, McCutcheon, McLaughlin, McNealy, McNees, Marston, Metcalf, Nerland, Nolan, Nordale, Peratrovich, R. Rivers, V. Rivers, Rosswog, Stewart, Smith, Sweeney, Taylor, VanderLeest, Walsh, White, Wien, Mr. President.

Nays: 6 - Buckalew, Doogan, V. Fischer, Poulsen, Reader, Riley.

Absent: 2 - Robertson and Sundborg.)

CHIEF CLERK: 47 yeas, 6 nays, and 2 absent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: So the "yeas" have it and the resolutions may be placed before us at this time in first reading. Mr. Ralph Rivers.

R. RIVERS: Mr. President, I now ask unanimous consent that we reserve Resolution No. 1 for the statehood resolution, and assign No. 2 and so on to these others which we are about to consider.

PRESIDENT EGAN: You have heard Mr. Ralph Rivers unanimous consent request. Hearing no objection it is so ordered. Mr. Rivers, we already have some other resolutions that have been numbered.

R. RIVERS: Mr. President, I would like to ask a question of Mr. Coghill. You spoke of having No. 1 for the statehood resolution. We have already adopted some resolutions. Was it your intention that we should renumber the others and assign No. 1 to the statehood resolution?

COGHILL: Mr. President, we didn't have any authority or jurisdiction over the other resolutions. We just thought that we would lead ours out with the statehood resolution.

R. RIVERS: Well, that wouldn't get yours at the top of the -- my way, would it? I withdraw my request.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Ralph Rivers withdraws his request. The Chair has just been informed that a bus is waiting for our friends from down along the railbelt. Would the Chief Clerk please read the first resolution for the first time by "Resolve" only?

(The Chief Clerk read the "Resolve" in the resolution

pertaining to a memorial following the election of senators and a representative under the Tennessee Plan.)

COGHILL: Mr. President, I move and ask unanimous consent that this resolution be adopted.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill moves and asks unanimous consent that the rules be suspended, that the first reading be considered the second reading, that the first reading also will be considered the third reading, and that it be adopted by the Convention. Is there objection? Hearing no objection the resolution is ordered adopted. Will the Chief Clerk please read the next resolution in its entirety?

(The Chief Clerk read the next resolution by the Committee

on Administration, entitled: "Recognition of the Services of Dr. Moberg.")

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: I move that all rules be suspended and ask unanimous consent that this resolution be passed.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill requests unanimous consent that the rules be suspended, that first reading be considered the second and third readings, and that the resolution be adopted unanimously by the Convention. Is there objection? Mr. Ralph Rivers.

R. RIVERS: Mr. President, just one point. Should this not be the Convention "acknowledges" with deep appreciation, instead of "acknowledge". It's a point for the Style and Drafting Committee, no objection.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is there objection to the adoption of the resolution? Hearing no objection it is so ordered and the resolution has been adopted. Will the Chief Clerk please read the third resolution?

(The Chief Clerk then read the resolution by the Committee

on Administration, entitled: "Press, Radio and Television".)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: I move that all rules be suspended and ask unanimous consent that this resolution be adopted.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill moves and asks unanimous consent that the first reading be considered the second reading and that the resolution be adopted unanimously by the Convention. Is there objection? Hearing no objection the resolution is ordered adopted. The Chief Clerk will please read the fourth resolution.

(The Chief Clerk then read the resolution by the Committee

on Administration entitled "Chaplains".)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, I move that all rules be suspended and ask unanimous consent that this resolution be adopted.

KILCHER: I object.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill moves that all rules be suspended and that this resolution be adopted. Is there a second?

SWEENEY: I second the motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Seconded by Mrs. Sweeney. The question is, "Shall the rules be suspended that the first reading be considered the second and third readings, and the resolution adopted by the Convention?" The Chief Clerk will call the roll.

(The Chief Clerk called the roll with the following result:

Yeas: 51 - Armstrong, Awes, Barr, Boswell, Buckalew, Coghill, Collins, Cooper, Cross, Davis,Doogan, Emberg, H. Fischer, V. Fischer, Gray, Harris, Hellenthal, Hermann, Hilscher, Hinckel, Hurley, Johnson, King, Knight, Laws, Lee, Londborg, McCutcheon, McLaughlin, McNealy, McNees, Marston, Metcalf, Nerland, Nolan, Nordale, Peratrovich, Poulsen, Reader, R. Rivers, V. Rivers, Rosswog, Smith, Stewart, Sweeney, Taylor, VanderLeest, Walsh, White, Wien and Mr. President.

Nays: Kilcher

Absent: 3 - Riley, Robertson, Sundborg.)

CHIEF CLERK: 51 yeas, 1 nay, and 3 absent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: So the rules have been suspended for the purpose stated and the resolution is ordered adopted. Are there other resolutions? The Chief Clerk will continue with the reading of the resolutions.

(The Chief Clerk read the resolution by the Committee on

Administration entitled: "Students of the University".)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, I move that all rules be suspended and ask unanimous consent that this resolution be passed.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill moves and asks unanimous consent that all rules be suspended, that first reading be considered second and third reading, and that the resolution be adopted. Is there objection? Hearing no objection, the resolution is ordered adopted.

(The Chief Clerk then read the next resolution by Committee

on Administration entitled, "Officials of the University".)

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, the Convention will be at recess for one minute.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President. I move that all rules be suspended and ask unanimous consent that this resolution be adopted.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill moves and asks unanimous consent that the rules be suspended, that first reading of the resolution be considered second and third readings, and that the resolution be adopted. Is there objection. Hearing no objection the resolution is ordered adopted. Are there other resolutions?

COGHILL: Yes, I have one.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chief Clerk may proceed with the reading of the resolutions.

(The Chief Clerk then read a resolution introduced by John

Coghill, Chairman of the Committee on Administration, for the orderly disposition of the property and records and other unfinished business of the Convention.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Victor Fischer.

V. FISCHER: May I ask for a one-minute recess?

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, the Convention is at recess for one minute.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, I move and ask unanimous consent that the rules be suspended and that this resolution be placed in second reading, and ask unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill moves and asks unanimous consent that the rules be suspended and we consider this resolution in second reading at this time. Is there objection? Mr. Nolan.

NOLAN: Mr. President, I haven't any objection, but it has come to my attention and I think it was brought up in the Administration Committee about the members being able to get copies of the transcript and sections of the tape, and I thought maybe there would be some statement made as to how they were going to get that at this time.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Nolan, as far as the Chair is concerned, the Chair feels there is nothing that prohibits it. If a member wants to pay for a certain portion of the tape and so long as he or she has the proper operators to do that recording for them, there is no prohibition against that at any time. But it might be a subject which it would be well to discuss.

NOLAN: That is why I brought the subject up because I thought that someone should be in charge so they could do that.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Victor Rivers.

V. RIVERS: Mr. Chairman, we in the Statehood Committee have talked about that, and we feel that it is an obligation of the Convention in completing its business that we should have a transcript of the substance matter of the stenotype record. I see in here that it provides for two typed copies. That would be verbatim of all of the hassles, committee meetings, and floor procedures. We already have the formal journal which shows all final action taken on each article, each amendment, where it was adopted, as amended, and so forth. But in the State of New Jersey, they took the substance matter, and taking just substance, they amended out a great deal of the floor procedure. They then had the substance matter of the discussions to supplement their working Journal. It was the thought of myself and the other members of the Statehood Committee, and I have discussed it with the Administration Committee, that we would like to see that done, and perhaps have one hundred mimeographed copies made up and bound, one for distribution for each member of the Convention and perhaps to each court and a number to be placed in the files of the Secretary of the Territory, later of the State, for reference matter by the legislature. It is our conviction that there are funds available to do that and it is an obligation of the funds of this Convention. At some later date we might even be able to have it printed. I am going to move that this Section (d) be amended to cover that particular process so that such information will be made available. I do believe with the Committee that two identical typed copies or as many as could be run in one typing, say one original and four carbons, should be made up and placed on file as a record in the Secretary of State's office, verbatim down to the last period.

UNIDENTIFIED DELEGATE: Point of order. The resolution hasn't been advanced to second reading, has it?

PRESIDENT EGAN: It hasn't been advanced, but Mr. Nolan

V. RIVERS: Well, I think I have said all I have to say on it anyway.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The question is, "Shall the rules be suspended and the resolution be placed before us in second reading at this time?" Is there objection? Hearing no objection it is so ordered. Mr. White.

WHITE: Mr. President, I move that further consideration of this resolution be deferred at this time, and that it be continued in second reading until tomorrow.

RILEY: Second it.

PRESIDENT EGAN: We have the unanimous consent request before us -- oh, it is in second reading. The motion is that further consideration of this resolution be deferred at this time, and that it be placed before the Convention tomorrow. Mr. Fischer.

V. FISCHER: I saw Mr. Coghill nodding his head so I ask unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Unanimous consent is asked that the resolution be deferred until tomorrow. Is there objection? Hearing no objection it is so ordered. The resolution is deferred until tomorrow. Are there other resolutions? Now with relation to that, Mr. White, do you have any suggestions as to when that would be taken up tomorrow?

WHITE: May I ask Mr. Coghill if those are all the resolutions he has?

COGHILL: Mr. President. those are all the resolutions that we have, if my memory serves me right, but I think we have three more coming down. However, Mr President, the schedule for tomorrow, and convening over at the gymnasium at 2:00 which will take approximately an hour and a half, we could recess and come back here. We have 55 more copies -- no, 60 more copies of the Constitution to sign here and at that time, if it is the pleasure of the Convention, we will have those other three, plus this, that we can consider.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. White.

WHITE: Mr. President, with resolutions still in the Administration Committee not ready for distribution at this time, I move that it be the policy of the Convention that at the close of the ceremonies tomorrow, the proper motion to adjourn or recess, that there be a motion that the Convention recess to the call of the Chair. That is the end of the motion -- with the purpose in mind that we can then come back here and when the signing is over, we can go back into session to consider further resolutions or any other business to come before the Convention, because I think it appears to most people that on Monday morning prior to 10:00 a.m. we probably won't have time to finish up all that needs finishing.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Now, Mr. White, before placing the motion, if the Chair may, when we come back here tomorrow afternoon, we will probably get back in here around 4:30. That would just be the guess of the Chair. Then we will have all the copies to sign which might take anywhere from an hour and a half to two hours. It's possible that it might take longer than that even. Then we are to be guests of the University upstairs at 6:30. Is that right? At 7:00 p.m. It might be necessary in order to accomplish what you have in mind that we have a night session, possibly real late tomorrow night. The Chair just wanted to bring that to the attention of the delegates, that the time schedule might not work out in any other fashion other than we have a late night session on Sunday night. Did someone second your motion Mr. White, or did you ask unanimous consent?

WHITE: I heard no second; I will ask unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Miss Awes.

AWES: I want to raise a point of information. As I understood Mr. White, he said we would come over here and sign the documents and then if we had time that we could convene the Convention. Well, won't we convene and then sign the documents? It seems that that ought to be done while we are in session.

PRESIDENT EGAN: You are probably correct, Miss Awes, and we will undoubtedly be in session while the signing of these documents is taking place. Unanimous consent is asked that the motion of Mr. White be adopted as the policy of the Convention. Is there objection? Hearing no objection it is so ordered and that is the manner in which we will proceed. Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: One other item that the Committee on Administration would like to convey to the delegates, that this evening upon adjourning we would like to have them clear their tables off so that we will have all of the papers and whatnot cleared off of the tables in order to expedite this signing procedure that we will have to go through tomorrow afternoon.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Ralph Rivers.

R. RIVERS: It was brought forward earlier in the afternoon that we were to take some action now in regard to putting the question tomorrow. I think that ought to be brought up again.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Collins.

COLLINS: I move that this Convention now consider the adoption of the Constitution for the State of Alaska in its present form.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Walsh.

WALSH: I second the motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Collins moves, seconded by Mr. Walsh, that the Convention agree upon the Constitution for the State of Alaska in its final form at this time. The question is, "Shall the Convention agree upon the Constitution -- the proposed Constitution -- for the State of Alaska in its final form?"

UNIDENTIFIED DELEGATE: Roll Call.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Davis.

DAVIS: If there is no further debate on this matter at this time, I would move that we put the previous question and then, as we have previously agreed, adjourn, or recess the Convention until tomorrow.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Davis moves and asks unanimous consent that the previous question be ordered at this time. Is there objection? Hearing no objection it is so ordered, and the previous question is before us. Mr. White.

WHITE: I move the Convention stand at recess until 2:00 p.m. tomorrow.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. White moves and asks unanimous consent that the Convention stand at recess until 2:00 p.m. tomorrow. Is there objection? Mr. Ralph Rivers.

R. RIVERS: Is there a question of recess or adjourning?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Ralph Rivers, there is no question in the mind of the Chair but that, with this agreement, you can adjourn and have the previous question, as has been set as a policy of the Convention, before us at that time.

R. RIVERS: We can adjourn as usual and not recess until tomorrow? Then that recess will carry us over until Monday morning?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: If this motion carries we will be adjourned until 2:00 p.m. tomorrow afternoon?

PRESIDENT EGAN: That is right.

COGHILL: We have several items on the Committee on Administration that we would like to bring before the body.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, before the question is put, Mr. Coghill, you may.

COGHILL: One of them is that we have the official pens for the signing of the documents and it is the request of the Committee on Administration, that upstairs in the message center room are the pen points for these pens, for the individual delegates to pick out the type of point they are used to writing with. That is number one. Number two is that if any of the delegates have not got return travel orders to their homes, or they are going to go by a different route, they are to leave the information with the Chief Clerk or one of the designated people upstairs in the secretariat (secretarial) area. Number three is that they shall have to know how they are going to go home and when they are going to go home in order to make this out for the per diem, and this all should be taken care of this afternoon before the delegates go into town.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Davis.

DAVIS: Mr. President, I think that nearly all of the delegates are in the same shape that I am, we all have excess baggage now. I wonder if the Administration Committee has done anything toward taking care of paying for the excess baggage which we may have over our allowance.

COGHILL: Your Committee on Administration will be meeting immediately upon adjournment and we shall take that subject up.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Davis.

DAVIS: Before adjournment I would like to announce a very short meeting of the Style and Drafting Committee in the gallery.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Style and Drafting Committee in the gallery immediately upon adjournment. Mr. Fischer.

V. FISCHER: To get this point cleared up, I would like to ask exactly where and when we assemble tomorrow afternoon.

COGHILL: The Committee on Administration has recommended previously that all the delegates and their guests will assemble at the University gymnasium at 1:30 p.m.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Ralph Rivers.

R. RIVERS: To clear up a point that was left dangling, I suggest that it be understood by the Convention that Style and Drafting has the usual authority to change the numbers on the resolutions and rearrange the resolutions as to style.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is there objection to that? Hearing no objection, Style and Drafting is authorized to do that.

KILCHER: May I make a short statement for the record?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is there objection to Mr. Kilcher making a short statement for the record?

BUCKALEW: I will object.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Objection is heard.

KILCHER: Then I will ask for a point of personal privilege.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, Mr. Kilcher, you may have the floor.

(Mr. Kilcher then spoke for a few moments on a point of

personal privilege.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is nothing else to be announced now. at 6:30 this evening there will be -- at 6:30 at the Traveler's Inn, the guests can assemble. At 7:30 there will be a no-host dinner. Mr. Buckalew.

BUCKALEW: Mr. President, what is going to happen at 6:30?

PRESIDENT EGAN: They will assemble. (Laughter) The Convention will come to order. Mr. Metcalf.

METCALF: May I ask Mr. Coghill a question? The bus leaves the Nordale Hotel at what time tomorrow?

COGHILL: We will arrange for a special bus to leave the Nordale at noon -- excuse me -- at 1:00 p.m. for the delegates.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Harris.

HARRIS: I was wondering if that divident that Mr. Hilscher declared the other day would be the same today.

HILSCHER: Yea, verily, sir. (Laughter)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. white.

WHITE: I made the motion to recess because of considerable discussion that had taken place about the effect of a motion to adjourn. Upon the ruling of the Chair that a motion to adjourn will not kill the action of the previous question, I ask that it be amended to read that we adjourn until 2:00 p.m. tomorrow.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. White moves and asks unanimous consent that the Convention stand adjourned until 2:00 p.m. tomorrow. Is there objection? Hearing no objection, it is so ordered and the Convention stands adjourned.