ALASKA CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION

February 6, 1956

SEVENTY-SIXTH DAY

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Reverend Londborg, would you give the invocation?

REVEREND LONDBORG: Our Heavenly Father, we would pause before Thee for a moment this morning as we begin this session. We pray that You would be with us as we conclude the business of this Convention this day. We thank You for Your leading and Your guiding hand throughout the past days and weeks, that You have brought us to the close of this Convention with what we believe to be a successful constitution. Heavenly Father, we pray that You will be with us now as we bring our deliberations to a close. Bless each of us as we go to our respective homes. We pray that we may look back upon this time together with thankfulness in our hearts for having learned to know one another, for having been privileged to work with one another. Bless us, we pray, as we continue in Thy name, Amen.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mrs. Hermann.

HERMANN: Mr. President, I move that the prayer we have just heard be spread upon the minutes of today's proceedings.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mrs. Hermann moves and asks unanimous consent that the prayer we have just heard be spread upon the pages of today's journal. Hearing no objection it is so ordered. At this time does the chairman of the Committee on Administration have a report to make? Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, your Committee on Administration had its final meeting. The records of the Committee have been turned over to the officials of the Convention, and in our final report of expenditures we are happy to announce that $33,818.76 will be turned over to the President for his disposition of the rest of the Convention. Out of this fund we have, as allocated on our estimated budget for salaries, we allocated $61,325. We went in the hole $406 on this amount. The delegates' per diem was $88,620, and we have left in that fund $1,488.28. The travel of the delegates was estimated at $9,182.98. We have left in that fund $1,796.88. Social Security for the delegates was allocated at $1,247. We have a remainder of $13.70 in that fund. The salaries for the secretariat we allocated $31,739. We are returning $5,403.10. Other staff expenses were $3,532.12. We are returning $2,841. Technical and consultant expenses were allocated at $25,000. $6,381.48 is being returned. Equipment for the Convention was allocated at $1,500. We went in the hole $3.00. Supplies and postage was allocated at $3,500. We went in the hole $1,887.64. Recording of the plenary session allocated at $12,000, and we have spent the full amount of that money. Other convention expenses -- the printing of the constitution was allocated at $9,000. Not being in our jurisdiction to spend this, we are returning to you the full $9,000. We had miscellaneous other expenses of $17,978.90. We are returning to you $12,412.07, a grand total of $33,818.76. Mr. President, at this time we would like to also announce to the delegates as soon as we adjourn sine die that the delegates will please go upstairs and see Miss Goad in the message center room and be sure that all vouchers and per diem and travel are signed. Otherwise, they will not be able to fulfill their paper work. And the Committee on Administration has also agreed not to pay excess baggage home for the delegates. At this time, Mr. President, we would like to ask permission of the Chair to retire the Committee on Administration.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill, before doing that, now the $9,000. that you mentioned, is there any of that obligated at the present time?

COGHILL: Mr. President, there will probably be several hundred dollars of the $33,000 obligated that will have to be taken care of after we adjourn sine die, but it is not in the jurisdiction of the Committee on Administration. There will be other staff expenses. However, on the secretariat this is projected through this week for you.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Through Saturday, is that right?

COGHILL: Through to Saturday of this week. However, there will be additional expenses for the stenotyping and there will be additional expenses as to the transportation and storage of materials, of the papers to the Secretary of Alaska, and the $9,000 was a budget item for us on the printing and ratification of the Constitution. A portion of that is obligated by the printing of these one hundred copies. However, we felt that any amount of the $33,000 that is left is now in your jurisdiction to dispose of.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill, is there any amount -- or are there any of those funds that are obligated at this time to the Alaska Statehood Committee or have all those obligations been completely cleared up to this point?

COGHILL: As far as the Committee on Administration knows, all the obligations to date to the Statehood Committee have been taken care of.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chair would like to announce that, in order to keep the record straight here, that the vouchers for January have not yet come to the Statehood Committee and there will be at least $6,000 of that that is already obligated. So that would be $6,000 less than the figure that you mentioned, Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, the Administration Committee is aware that there will be other obligations. However, we felt that it was not in our jurisdiction; that it was in yours, sir.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chair just wants to make it clear that there are many thousands of dollars of that already obligated and then the February obligations to PAS through the Alaska Statehood Committee will also entail considerable amount of those funds. Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: I wonder whether we may not have copies of this tentative report of the Committee on Administration as to expenditures mimeographed so that every delegate could have one.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: It is the plan that we will have them, that the bookkeeper worked last night to get this program setup for us, and we will also note on that that there are obligations to be incurred out of this, that this is not a clear fund.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mrs. Sweeney.

SWEENEY: Mr. President, I believe the one thing that Chairman Coghill forgot to mention that the Committee went on record of approving the supplying of one large apportionment map to each delegate. They will have that for their work at home.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Show that as a matter for the record. Mr. Victor Rivers.

V. RIVERS: Mr. President, along this same line, it seems to me it would be very well if this Convention went on record authorizing the President to have a postaudit made before he closes his records so that he will have a complete record to his own satisfaction of all expenditures when the work of the entire Convention is completed and the balance reverts to the Territory.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is there objection?

V. RIVERS: I ask unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Victor Rivers asks unanimous consent. Mr. Nolan.

NOLAN: Mr. President, I wonder if it would not be a good idea to contact the present legislative auditor that we have. He could probably do that.

V. RIVERS: It might be a very good idea.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Nolan, the President will certainly do that, and if it is possible to have the audit conducted through him, it will be done. Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: I feel this matter is sufficiently important that it should be in the form of a written resolution of the Convention that there should be an audit. I would like to suggest that the Committee on Administration prepare such a resolution now so that we can act on it before adjourning.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, it would be necessary to have a few minutes' recess at this time in order that such a resolution may be drawn. The Convention will be at recess for a brief time in order that that be done.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, in this request of Mr. Rivers on a resolution for an audit, we had talked about that and felt that the Territory would make an audit. I believe that it is in the act that a report will be made to the next legislature, and it was at that time thought that there would be an audit. However, we have prepared a short resolution that would read: "WHEREAS it is necessary to provide an adequate report on the expenditure of appropriated funds by the convention; NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the President is authorized and directed to secure, at the earliest possible time, an audit of the funds expended by the Convention. DONE at College, Alaska, this sixth day of February, 1956, by direction of the Convention." Mr. President, it might be well to state at this time that a lot of these funds that we are turning back to you, it was not the intent of the Committee to report out that we were in the clear $33,818.76, that we knew there was the "Tennessee" plan, the election that will come in the fall, the ratification election, and the printing of the documents, the $5,000 that was directed in a resolution yesterday or as much as might be needed, and that there will be additional expenses as to stenotype help and other help as well as the reimbursement of the Statehood Committee. Those things were not projected by the Administration Committee because we do not have the figures. It was felt that the interim committee or the committee after the Convention has adjourned that will be appointed by the President will be able to take care of that, and the funds will be of course published in a public report to the next legislature. I move that this resolution be adopted, Mr. President, and ask unanimous consent.

LAWS: I second the motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill moves and asks unanimous consent that the resolution be adopted. Mr. Ralph Rivers.

R. RIVERS: Just for the moment, Mr. President, I wonder if we might not include in there that that audit be by a legislative auditor, suggest it or something like that. Now this legislative auditor is on the payroll anyway. We are the creature of the legislature. They have asked us to give a report. Let their auditor give us the postaudit; that might save a few dollars. If we would suggest that in this resolution, would that be helpful?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Ralph Rivers, that was brought up in a discussion here during the recess and we know it will definitely be done by the legislative auditor. By law he will have to do it anyway; he would have to make that audit; but if we mentioned it in there at this time, inasmuch as some of the cost won't be known until after the election, possibly until going into the fall, that if we implied that the audit should be made right at this time, there would be no real way that he could get the true picture, and if that was mentioned in there it might imply that we wanted the complete audit at the time, and under the circumstances where these costs will not be possible to project the true cost for several months.

R. RIVERS: I mean to say, noboby (nobody) is going to do an audit until we have the job done anyway. What is this about the "earliest possible time" anyway?

PRESIDENT EGAN: It shouldn't be there.

COGHILL: "Earliest possible time" would probably be right after the costs of the Alaska-Tennessee Plan are known and projected for the fall election, but it would be at the earliest possible time after the President was sure there was not going to be any more expenses. You could not very well set a date on the audit, but it will be for the next legislature.

R. RIVERS: Why don't you say "in time for the next legislature" instead of "earliest possible time"?

COGHILL: That would be the earliest possible time.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is there objection to the adoption of this resolution? Hearing no objection the resolution is ordered adopted.

COGHILL: Mr. President, in respect to the directive by the President that we should make the resolutions, the Committee on Administration has three more resolutions. These are all, I promise you, that the Committee is going to bring out, and we would like to revert to that business at this time.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection then we will revert to the business of introduction of resolutions at this time. The Chief Clerk will please read the resolution.

(The Chief Clerk read the resolution, by the Committee on

Administration, entitled: "Operation Statehood.")

PRESIDENT EGAN: What was that word? Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: I move and ask unanimous consent that this resolution be adopted.

BUCKALEW: Objection.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Objection is heard. Is there a second to the motion?

MARSTON: I second the motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Seconded by Mr. Marston. Could you explain what this word means and where it came from?

COGHILL: I will refer that to Mr. Marston.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Marston, will you explain the words?

MARSTON: That [kee-see-voot-mootichi] means "Operation Statehood". It has more punch than anything else in this deal.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is it Eskimo?

MARSTON: I don't know, sir.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Objection was heard to the passage of the resolution. Mr. Buckalew.

BUCKALEW: I would like to speak on this. I am not going to vote for any of these resolutions. I am going to object to every one that comes up because I am afraid we are going to miss somebody along the line. We have included I don't know how many people; and we are liable to miss somebody and make somebody unhappy. We can go on and make resolutions by the barrel-full, and we'll have more resolutions than we have constitution. Those people in "Operation Statehood" were treated well up here. They were welcomed by all the delegates and this is a useless act, and I am going to vote against it.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The question is: "Shall the resolution be adopted by the Convention?" All those in favor will signify by saying "Aye"; all opposed, by saying "No". The "Ayes" have it and the resolution is ordered adopted. The Chief Clerk will please read the next resolution.

(The Chief Clerk read the resolution, by Committee on

Administration, entitled: "Convention Consultants.")

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: I move that the resolution be adopted.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill moves that the resolution be adopted.

GRAY: I second the motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Seconded by Mr. Gray. The question is, "Shall the resolution be adopted by the Convention? All those in favor of adopting the resolution will signify by saying "Aye"; all opposed, by saying "No". The "Ayes" have it and the resolution is ordered adopted. The Chief Clerk will please read the next resolution.

(The Chief Clerk read the resolution, by the Committee on

Administration, entitled: "Staff of Convention Secretariat.")

COGHILL: Mr. President, I move and ask unanimous consent that this resolution be adopted.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill asks unanimous consent for the adoption of this resolution. Is there objection?

BUCKALEW: Objection.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Objection is heard. Is there a second?

H. FISCHER: I second the motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mrs. Fischer seconds the motion. The question is: "Shall the resolution be adopted?" All those in favor of adopting the resolution will signify by saying "Aye"; all opposed, by saying "No". The "Ayes" have it and the resolution is ordered adopted. At this time the Chair would declare a one-minute recess.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order.

McCUTCHEON: Mr. President, I have just been lobbied again. Here some time earlier in the Convention Mrs. Hermann had some complaints to make about lobbying tactics around here. I want to report I have been lobbied again. I feel we might offer at least some commendation, however, in this respect. It seems like the faithful wives of the Convention feel that, inasmuch as there are so many resolutions going around here, that the Convention should offer a resolution to the faithful wives of the Convention. (Laughter)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Hearing no objection, it is so ordered. Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: I notice the presence in the gallery of the man who represents the institution which has been our host throughout this session of the Alaska Constitutional Convention. I ask unanimous consent at this time that we grant the privilege of the floor to Dr. Ernest Patty, and invite him to come forward to receive the thanks of the Convention for the services which the University has extended throughout the session.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Adhering to the unanimous consent request, Dr. Patty, would you please come forward at this time? (Applause)

(Dr. Patty shook hands with President Egan.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Dr. Patty, we are extremely happy to have you with us at this time, and it is with great pleasure, and it will ever bring memories to each one of the delegates to this Convention of the kindness that you and your faculty and student body of the University have extended to us over the 75 days, and of the hard work and real effort that you have made each one of those days to help us make this Constitutional Convention a success. There is not enough that we could say to really express our appreciation to you and everyone else on campus for the fine job you have done for the Territory of Alaska in making your services available for all this long length of time, and I am very happy to present to you for the University a copy of the Constitution of the State of Alaska, one of the original copies; also to extend to you for the University the official gavel of the Convention.

DR. PATTY: President Egan and members of the Convention, in behalf of the University I am extremely pleased to accept these. Our labors have been a labor of love, and you can realize how much we have appreciated having you here, and how much we think of the fine efforts and the fine accomplishment you have made. It will be our plan to have a suitable glass case made so we can display this Constitution with the Preamble, and with your signatures, probably in the new library when it is built, and in the meantime in the museum, so that our young Alaskans who are here will be inspired as all of us have been inspired when we have gone to the Library of Congress in Washington and stood before a copy of the Constitution of the United States. Thank you very, very much. (Applause)

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Mr.

Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: Mr. President, may we revert to committee reports?

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection the Convention will revert to the order of business of committee reports.

SUNDBORG: Your Committee on Style and Drafting to whom was referred two resolutions prior to their passage, reports them back to the Convention at this time. One is the resolution dealing with friendly relations with Canada and the other, the resolution dealing with orderly transition from Territory status to statehood. Copies have been distributed to each of the delegates, and as I mentioned, these resolutions have not been officially adopted as yet by the Convention.

PRESIDENT EGAN: You ask unanimous consent that the report of the Committee adopted?

SUNDBORG: I ask that our report be accepted, Mr. President, and I move that first the resolution "Friendly Relations with Canada" be adopted by the Convention.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Sundborg asks unanimous consent that the report of the Style and Drafting Committee be accepted, and moves and asks unanimous consent that the resolution with respect to "Friendly Relations with Canada" be adopted by the Convention. Is there objection? Hearing no objection it is so ordered. Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: Mr. President, I now ask unanimous consent that the resolution dealing with "Orderly Transition from Territorial Status to Statehood" be adopted by the Convention.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Sundborg asks unanimous consent that the resolution be adopted by the Convention.

UNIDENTIFIED DELEGATE: Objection.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Objection is heard. Haven't these resolutions already been adopted by the Convention?

SUNDBORG: Mr. President, there were two that somehow in the process were not really adopted, and these are the two. I so move.

H. FISCHER: I second it.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Sundborg so moves, seconded by Mrs. Fischer, that the resolution dealing with transitory measures be adopted. The question is: "Shall the resolution be adopted by the Convention?"

RILEY: Mr. President, are we speaking of the first one proposed, or are we speaking of the "Orderly Transition"?

PRESIDENT EGAN: The "Orderly Transition".

RILEY: I would like to speak on this just a moment, if I may. The matter of orderly transition to statehood status, as it is entitled, is certainly a desirable objective, but I think that the language and the thought and the sponsorship of such a resolution is especially poor coming at this time from this Convention. I think it is politically unwise and psychologically poor, and I don't think that factually it is too good. I think it gives us a hat-in-hand position in going to the Congress at this time, and it undermines what dignity we have had up to now. I don't think the resolution will have any effect whatever, and I don't believe that it has discriminated particularly in the type of program to which it is directed, and I feel rather keenly that it should be defeated.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. R. Rivers.

R. RIVERS: Mr. President, the enabling legislation with its

grants-in-aid for highway construction and maintenance provides a long-range transition, and something that will enable the new state to make a go of it. There is this proposition, however, and it is reflected in the last paragraph of this resolution. Congress appropriates on a fiscal year from July 1 to July 1 for carrying out of Road Commission activities, the operation of the courts, the accounts with the recorders' offices, and perhaps in connection with the fisheries and resources. Now, if it could be argued that the moment that we become a state, or are declared a state, that the federal appropriations for that fiscal year might come to an end and not be available for further disbursement. Now, this paragraph to my mind makes sense and there is nothing in the present enabling law that says anything about it, and it reads this way: "...that the act to admit Alaska as a state of the Union be amended (we are flagging this for Congress) to provide for the continued use of federal appropriations for payment of the cost of the normal functions of government during the fiscal year in which admission of Alaska is accomplished, or until the operation of such functions is earlier assumed by the State." I don't like to see, just because of a void or a gap in there, an argument come up as to whether the money is appropriated for these Alaska functions might have a stop-order put on them by the Comptroller General or somebody else before that particular fiscal year for which those funds were appropriated expires, and I think this does serve a useful purpose. Let's flag it.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. McCutcheon.

McCUTCHEON: I would like to ask a question of Mr. Rivers through the Chair. Is it not true, Mr. Rivers, that in the previous admission of the states that Congress has always taken such precaution as to appropriate certain funds for transitional purposes, and that the states have not had to go on their knees asking for those funds? It has been a matter of natural function of Congress to make the transition? Is that not true?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Ralph Rivers.

R. RIVERS: I have not looked into detailed appropriation procedures in connection with past constitutions. There has not been any since 1912, but I do know that Congress appropriating for a fiscal year is going to appropriate as though the Federal Government were going to continue those funds until the end of the fiscal year. If we get admitted during the middle of the year, we just want to be sure that the enabling law or some related legislation will say the appropriations are still available to be disbursed until the end of the fiscal year for which they were appropriated.

McCUTCHEON: Are you in a position, Mr. Rivers, that you wouldn't accept statehood unless the government did such a thing?

R. RIVERS: This is part of the orderly transition and we are pointing up something that would be important for the orderly transition. Your other question is argumentative.

McCUTCHEON: Mr. President, it is argumentative, and that is what I propose to argue about. I feel that under the circumstances that I must support Mr. Riley's remarks, and that I feel that at this time that Alaska should be able to stand on its own feet. Congress is not going to be so derelict in its duties that if they are going to give us statehood that they are going to overlook the proposition of providing the proper transitional funds. Under the circumstances, I think this particular document here that we are to consider is absolutely ill-advised. We have taken a bold step in setting forth the "Tennessee Plan". We want to become a state, and we want to become a state immediately if we possibly can, and that does not mean ten years from now, that means immediately, tomorrow, if they will grant it to us. And I don't think that our Territory at this time, in view of the action we have already taken, should hesitate for one second to accept statehood whether or not the Federal Congress will give us the funds to make such a so-called orderly transition. If they won't do it, let us do it ourselves and take statehood now.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Fischer.

V. FISCHER: I mover the previous question and ask unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Unanimous consent is asked that the previous question be ordered. Is there objection?

KILCHER: Objection.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Objection is heard.

MCLAUGHLIN: I second the motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Seconded by Mr. McLaughlin. The question is: "Shall the previous question be ordered?" All those in favor of ordering the previous question will signify by saying "Aye"; all opposed, by saying "No". The "Ayes" have it and the previous question is ordered. The question is: "Shall the resolution be adopted?" All those in favor of adopting the resolution will signify by saying "Aye"; all opposed, by saying "No". The "Noes" have it and the resolution has failed of adoption. Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: Mr. President, still under the heading of committee reports, your Committee on Style and Drafting reports to the Convention that it has redrafted, following their passage, resolutions on Certification under the Alaska Tennessee Plan; Alaska Native Lands; Press, Radio, and Television; Students of the University; and Recognition of the Services of Dr. Moberg. And copies have been distributed to the delegates. Mr. President, I don't know whether we were instructed to restyle or redraft the resolutions adopted last night and today, which we have not had a chance to work on. If that is the desire of the Convention we will be glad to go over them and put them in possibly a little better form.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is there objection to the suggestion as made by the Chairman of the Style and Drafting Committee? Mr. Boswell.

BOSWELL: Mr. President, temporary objection. Can I direct a question to Mr. Sundborg?

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection.

BOSWELL: Would you read your first paragraph of the resolution on the students of the University?

SUNDBORG: "Students of the University. WHEREAS the Alaska Constitutional Convention has acquired the building." (Laughter) Obviously there is something wrong with that.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection the Convention will be at recess for one minute.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: Mr. President, the boiler room very valiantly tried to read the handwriting of one of our members, maybe our secretary. and has inserted the word "acquired" which should have been the word "occupied", so if I may be excused from reading the rest of that paragraph, we will make that correction, Mr. Boswell.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Without objection the change will be made in the resolution. Mr. Marston.

MARSTON: Mr. President, on this "Friendly Relations with Canada", you put an extra "A" in Alberta. Would you take that out? The last line.

NORDALE: We will take it out.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Are there other resolutions? Mr. White.

WHITE: Mr. President, as my wife keeps reminding me, the task of housekeeping is never an easy one, and when that house contains fifty-five hardheaded individuals, each of whom is sure he know how it should be done, it does not get any easier. I would lke (like) to move and ask unanimous consent that the Administration Committee and its Chairman, Mr. Coghill, receive the appreciation of the Convention for a difficult and detailed task well done.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. White asks unanimous consent and hearing no objection the motion is orderd (ordered) adopted. Mr. White.

WHITE: Mr. President, before my voice gives out, may we revert to committee reports?

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, Mr. White.

WHITE: Mr. President, the Committee to read the journal would like to report the Journal of the 69th Convention day, Monday, January 30, with the following corrections: On page 19, third paragraph from the bottom, correct a typographical error in the word "Article". The journal for the 70th Convention day, on page 1, in the prayer, on the second line, capitalize the "t" in "Thee"; on the 6th line, same correction; and on the last line, capitalize the "t" in "Thy"; on page 1 still, third paragraph from the bottom, the last line, where it says "Rule Committee", add an "s" to "Rule"; and on page 7, in the first paragraph, after "3:30", insert "p.m.". The journal for the 71st Convention day, no corrections; the journal for the 72nd Convention day, likewise no corrections. Mr. President, we ask unanimous consent for the approval of the journal of the 69th, 70th, 71st, and 72nd days.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. White moves and asks unanimous consent that the journals of the 69th, 70th, 71st, and 72nd Convention days be approved along with the suggested corrections as made by the special committee to read the Journal. Is there objection? Hearing no objection the journals are ordered approved. Mr. White.

WHITE: Mr. President, the Committee would like to announce that the journals for the last three days are not yet ready, that they will be mailed to the delegates, and the committee would like to move that the President with the assistance of Mr. Doogan be authorized to correct the Journals for the last three days prior to that mailing.

PRESIDENT EGAN: You have heard the motion as made by Mr. White. Is there objection? Hearing no objection it is so ordered. The Convention will come to order. Mrs. Hermann.

HERMANN: Mr. Chairman, since it seems to be in order to extend thanks to everybody today, I would like to extend the thanks of the Convention to the Committee that read the Journal day after day and did the correcting. (Applause)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mrs. Hermann has asked unanimous consent that the thanks of the Convention be extended to the special Committee to read the Journal. Hearing no objection it is so ordered. Is there anything else to come before the Convention? Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: One other thing that we discussed this morning before coming into session is the extra 40 copies that we have with the signatures printed by plate. Now, we had a 100 copies made for the Convention, 60 of which were signed yesterday by the delegates and 40 that had the printed signatures on them. Fifty-five of these went to the delegates, five were the official copies, and we have 40 left. Now, it is a big question as to where those 40 are going to go. It was referred to the Committee on Administration and the Committee on Administration referred it back to myself to get together with Mr. Egan, the President of the Convention, and the Secretary. We discussed it this morning and the five originals go to: one to the Secretary of Alaska to be transmitted to the Secretary of the new state; the second one to go to the Congress of the United States; the third to the University Museum as was presented this morning; the fourth to the Territorial Museum; and the fifth to the Department of Libraries. That is the disposition of the five originals. Now, the other 40 it was felt by the group that this should be discussed thoroughly on the floor. We thought that perhaps four of them could go to the district courts, one to each District Court, to be filed with the Clerk of the Court so it could be referred to at any time. It was felt that one should be presented to the Governor, and one should be presented to Bob Bartlett, our Delegate in Congress. Now, that would take care of six of the 40, and there are 32 school districts in Alaska, but there are more high schools than 32 high schools, because of Wasilla and Bethel and there are several other high schools. So it was more or less left up in the air by the Committee on three to bring it out on the floor and find what the Convention delegates wished to do. It would be nice to have the schools each get one, and I planned this morning to try and find out how many libraries there are in Alaska and it was felt that maybe a few more copies could be made as the press is still set up in the News-Miner rinting room. Mr. President, I place this on the floor for discussion with no alternative in mind.

BUCKALEW: Mr. President, it is getting late. I move and ask unanimous consent that the Convention delegate the authority to determine what we're going to do with the 40 copies to Mr. President and Mr. Coghill.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chair would like to say that Mr. Sundborg has informed us that the plates are still available and there could be enough additional copies made easily enough so that all the schools would have one and that the libraries, the judges, and those that have been mentioned, without any real difficulty. Mr. Marston.

MARSTON: Mr. President, the last year the Cook Inlet Historical Society has organized a live membership of about four hundred. They have a nice quarters at Anchorage, and the President of the Cook Inlet Historical Society is right here. We would like to have one for that society. We put a request in right now for it.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Ralph Rivers.

R. RIVERS: I would like to suggest that each of our consultants have one of these. I know Mr. Sheldon Elliott, for instance, would treasure it very highly and Mr. Bebout, and the various other consultants.

PRESIDENT EGAN: In reference to this motion made by Mr. Buckalew, now everyone would like to have one of these, we know, everywhere in Alaska and everywhere else, and it would seem to me that unless there is specific instruction to the contrary, that the schools and the libraries ought to be the ones; otherwise, we will run into a very difficult problem, and the President or whoever is charged with the responsibility would probably have to move out of the new state. (Laughter) Mr. Harris.

HARRIS: I was wondering, Mr. President, if Mr. Buckalew would amend his motion to allow the President to have as many extra copies as he sees fit printed.

BUCKALEW: I trust the President's judgment. I will consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is there objection? Mr. Fischer.

V. FISCHER: I do not object to Mr. Buckalew's request. I would like to further move, however, since we would be putting the President on the spot as to who gets copies and who doesn't, that each high school in Alaska and that each public library in Alaska and the Library of Congress receive a copy of the Constitution.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Buckalew, do you accept that amendment to your motion?

BUCKALEW: One question, Mr. Fischer, that will include the court libraries, won't it? Every library in Alaska; that will probably include the District Court library?

V. FISCHER: I meant primarily public libraries. I wasn't too concerned about the court libraries, they can get a regular printed copy. I think the public libraries should have the first priority. That is where the people at large go to look at things like this.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is there objection to the amended motion? Hearing no objection then the amended motion is ordered adopted. Is there anything else to come before the Convention? Mr. Hurley.

HURLEY: Mr. President, I will ask for a five-minute recess.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection the Convention will be at recess for five minutes.

RECESS

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT: The Convention will come to order. All you delegates will please take your seats. Mr. Hurley.

HURLEY: Mr. President, I have been selected by the Convention to present our final respects of this Convention to our great beloved President, William Egan, for a job well done. It seemed a little strange that I should be chosen for this position, and yet when we think about it, I perhaps represent those of us that are new in this field, and for that reason am perhaps best able to express the greatest appreciation which we have for the way in which our President has brought this Convention to a successful closing. He has maintained an academic atmosphere throughout the Convention, and yet has been always willing to accept the practical matters which must come before us. He has carried the whole Convention forward in a way that no one else could possibly have done. I think this occasion is somewhat similar to a group that has been through a major battle. We have earned a respect for our leader that can only come from having gone through all of the trials and tribulations of presenting to the future State of Alaska the document that they will live by for many years. And to Bill, we have arranged this present which Mrs. Wien will present in the form of a resolution.

WIEN: "WHEREAS for seventy-five Convention days, the Honorable William A. Egan has served as presiding officer; and WHEREAS in this capacity he has demonstrated to all, his parliamentary skill, his unwavering fairness, his personal friendliness, and his untiring devotion to duty; and WHEREAS the delegates and officers of this Convention desire to express their gratitude for his outstanding leadership, in a form that will endure along with their admiration, and in a form that will enable them to indicate their gratitude to his charming wife and son, as well as to all other Alaskans; NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Honorable William A. Egan, President of the Alaska Constitutional Convention of 1955, be asked to accept, as a token of our thanks, admiration, and affection, a portrait of himself, painted by the distinguished artist Christian von Schneidau on commission from the delegates, and that a copy of this resolution properly inscribed be presented to our esteemed President Egan." (Standing ovation for President Egan)

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT: Since this is in the form of a resolution the Chair will ask what is the pleasure of the Convention. Mr. Hurley.

HURLEY: I ask unanimous consent for the adoption of the resolution.

BUCKALEW: This is one resolution that Buckalew is certainly not going to object to.

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT: Hearing no objection it is so ordered. The resolution is adopted unanimously.

PRESIDENT EGAN: All I can say is that I certainly appreciate it. I will never forget a single one of you. You have done a wonderful job. (Standing ovation)

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT: The Chair will declare a recess for the congratulations that are in order.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Mr. Londborg.

LONDBORG: I move and ask unanimous consent that the remarks of Mr. Hurley and the resolution be spread upon the pages of today's Journal.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Unanimous consent is asked that the remarks of Mr. Hurley be spread upon today's Journal. Mr. McNees.

McNEES: At this time I think it is only fitting that the gentleman be introduced to this floor. He is the artist who painted this very fine portraiture of our President. I would like to introduce to you at this time, to those of you who have not met him, Christian von Schneidau, the artist who painted the portrait of our President. May I ask for the privilege of the floor, Mr. President?

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection. (Christian von Schneidau came on to the Convention floor at this time.) (Applause)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. von Schneidau, would you like to come forward?

(Mr. von Schneidau came forward and shook hands with President Egan.)

VON SCHNEIDAU: I would like to add to this feeling too. I am very deeply touched myself with this wonderful man, Mr. Egan. I thank you all for the privilege of being here and seeing that I am being pictured with my wonderful model, Mr. Egan. Thank you very much. (Standing ovation)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Marston.

MARSTON: Mr. President, I move and ask unanimous consent that President Patty be instructed to take a message over to the former President Bunnell and give him good greetings and the story of the Convention. He's over here on his sick-bed. I ask unanimous consent that that be done.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Marston asks unanimous consent that Dr. Patty be requested by the Convention to take that message to Dr. Bunnell, if he will. Is there objection to requesting Dr. Patty to convey the good wishes of the Convention to Dr. Bunnell? Hearing no objection the request will be made of Dr. Patty. Mr. McNealy.

McNEALY: At this time I would like to ask, Mr. President, that the delegates stand and give a bit of applause in honor of the Secretary of our Convention, Mr. Tom Stewart, for his untiring efforts toward making this Convention a success from its inception. (Standing ovation)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Reverend Armstrong.

ARMSTRONG: Mr. President, the committee you appointed a couple of days ago has tried to work in time to have some type of a charter for Alaska's children. It has been almost impossible under the pressure of our schedule to arrive at a final document, but we would like to present a tentative statement and ask that this continue to be referred to the committee where it will take final form, and that you be given the opportunity to distribute this to our school children throughout Alaska. The content of the final document would read something in this order: "You are Alaska's children. We bequeath to you a state that will be glorious in her achievements, a homeland filled with opportunities for living, a land where you can worship and pray, a country where ambitions will be bright and real, an Alaska that will grow with you as you grow. We trust you; you are our future. We ask you to take tomorrow and dream; we know that you will see visions we do not see. We are certain that in capturing today for you, you can plan and build. Take our constitution and study it, work with it in your classrooms, understand its meaning and the facts within it. Help others to love and appreciate it. You are Alaska's children. We bequeath to you the land, the mountains, the lakes, the skies. This is your land and we ask you to possess it." Signed by the President of the Alaska Constitutional Convention. I ask, sir, that this come in some final form that will be after this fashion. I move and ask unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Unanimous consent is asked and if there is no objection the matter will be attended to by the President. Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that we now grant the privilege of the floor to one who has very faithfully attended I think every session of our Convention, in order that we may pay our respects to her and make a presentation. I make this for Mrs. Florence Douthit, of the Fairbanks Daily News Miner. I ask unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Unanimous consent is asked. Mrs. Douthit, would you please come forward. (Mrs. Douthit went forward and she was given a standing ovation. She shook hands with President Egan.)

SUNDBORG: Mrs. Douthit, on behalf of the delegates to the Convention, we are very happy to present this to you. I will tell you without your even opening it that it is a baby cup, and we intend to send it outside to be inscribed with the following message: -- do you want to read the message or shall I? -- "Bestowed by grateful delegates upon an unborn child named Douthit who abided quietly throughout the Alaska Constitutional Convention and never offered an amendment." (Applause)

PRESIDENT EGAN: After the final adjournment, the Chair would like to state that at that time, it might be best for everyone to go to the coffee shop and have coffee, but it is felt that we might meet here informally to discuss various matters before you might leave for your homes, say around 10:30 this morning, if it is satisfactory with the delegates, so if none of the delegates would leave the campus in order that we might all have this disucssion here it would certainly be appreciated. Is there anything else to come before the Convention at this time. Mr. Armstrong.

ARMSTRONG: Mr. President, I would like to ask a question that the answer might be placed upon the record, and that is that the news report as it has come to us at the Convention is that a resignation was tendered by Mr. Robertson to the Convention. At this time have you received that resignation?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Nothing has been received, Mr. Armstrong; so far as the Chair knows, Mr. Robertson is here and just absent. There has not been one word of resignation or anything else received relative to that matter. Is there anything else to come before the Convention? Mr. McNealy.

McNEALY: This is not meant to be facetious, and I believe it is entirely proper. I have sat here for seventy-five days of the Convention. There has been one member of this Convention who, to my knowledge, and I am sure that I am right, has never taken the floor to speak upon any subject or to utter a word into the tape recording. At this time if the gentleman I am about to name does not care to say a word or two, I do trust that he will rise and take a bow because we have appreciated his quietness as much as some people have appreciated my talking. I refer to you, Mr. Peter Reader of Nome. (Applause)

READER: I certainly enjoyed my knowledge which I gained from this Convention, and I don't think anyone could ever buy it. (Applause)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Barr.

BARR: Mr. President, I especially appreciate Mr. Reader's performance because I don't believe that he offered an amendment all during the Convention.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Is there anything else to come before the Convention? Mr. Metcalf.

METCALF: May I make a brief remark? There has been some talk during the days of our Convention about selling this Constitution we have made, and I know for one, myself, I am going to try to get duplicate tapes of Governor Gruening's speech on American Colonialism as well as Senator Knowland's remarks on statehood and have them played on the local station. Whether that suggestion is good or bad it might be worth something to folks in other cities who might like to do likewise.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is there anything else to come before the Convention? If not -- Mr. Collins.

COLLINS: Bear with me just a moment. I realize that this has been a great emotional scene. It brings back to my mind the organization of the First Territorial Legislature. We met there, as the members of this Convention have met here, to organize a First Session of the Legislature forty-three years ago; to bring back to my mind that there are only three surviving members of that legislature. We wound up our duties with the same emotional scene as I have experienced here today. In that legislature we formed a friendship that was enduring, and little did I think that forty-three years from that date that there would be only three surviving members of that legislature -- the Honorable Henry Roden of Juneau, the Honorable Charles E. Jones of Nome, and myself. In all those years that friendship has become stronger and closer between the three of us, and I can see here today that the association and the friendship and the existence that are here within this Convention is going to bind the personalities of each and everyone of you that will endure for time to come when we enjoy the statehood of Alaska. Little did I think at that time, forty-three years hence that I would be a member of a Convention that was drawn here by the people of the Territory of Alaska to draft a constitution for the first statehood, and I say to you, it has been a wonderful experience, and as years go by the younger members will remember the meeting of the individuals of this Convention, and it will be cemented in friendship that will endure to help carry on the workings of the future State of Alaska, and I think it befitting at this time that we have another member of this Convention, one who has taken part in many of the public affairs of this Territory, and I think it would be fitting for this Convention to give the privilege to Mrs. Hermann to make the motion for the final adjournment of this Convention. (Applause)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Before the motion is put, the girls in the boiler room have a few pictures they wish the delegates to sign. Those pictures are on the press table and if possible when the meeting adjourns if the delegates would do so, it would be very much appreciated. Mrs. Hermann.

HERMANN: Mr. President, pursuant to a motion already made on this floor and carried, I move when we go forth from this assembly today, we do so in memory of two great Alaskans who pioneered the statehood movement -- Judge James Wickersham and Judge Anthony J. Dimond. Mr. President, I now move that we adjourn sine die.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Harris.

HARRIS: I second that motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Harris seconds the motion. The question is: "Shall the Constitutional Convention of Alaska adjourn sine die?" The Chief Clerk will call the roll.

(The Chief Clerk called the roll with the following result:

Yeas: 54 - Armstrong, Awes, Barr, Boswell, Buckalew, Coghill, Collins, Cooper, Cross, Davis, Doogan, Emberg, H. Fischer, V. Fischer, Gray, Harris, Hellenthal, Hermann, Hilscher, Hinckel, Hurley, Johnson, Kilcher, King, Knight, Laws, Lee, Londborg, McCutcheon, McLaughlin, McNealy, McNees, Marston, Metcalf, Nerland, Nolan, Nordale, Peratrovich, Poulsen, Reader, Riley, R. Rivers, V. Rivers, Rosswog, Smith, Stewart, Sundborg, Sweeney, Taylor, VanderLeest, Walsh, White, Wien, Mr. President.

Nays: 0

Absent: 1 - Robertson.)

CHIEF CLERK: 54 Yeas, 1 Absent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: And so the Convention has adjourned sine die.

(Applause)